Wednesday, July 14, 2010

The Wednesday Web Browser

If you've spent any time in the writerly Twitterverse in the past 24 hours or so, you've probably seen multiple mentions of I Write Like..., which will "analyze" a sample of your writing and tell you which famous writer you write like. Kinda fun (even if I don't really believe that my writing resembles the work of Stephen King or H.P. Lovecraft, and even if it seems odd that so few [any?] female authors' names are turning up). (UPDATE, 7/18: READ THIS--seems we've all fallen for a con.)
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Additional notes on grammar, usage, and style, courtesy of After Deadline.
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Just posted this week on the Fiction Writers Review site: my review of Jacob Paul's debut novel, Sarah/Sara. (Those of you who thought that this post was interesting should definitely take a look.)
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Last week's compilation of Jewish literary links draws from the Association of Jewish Libraries, The Boston Bibliophile, Tablet magazine, the Forward's "Arty Semite" blog, and more.
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Looking for some writing prompts? Sign up to receive a prompt each day through August from Lisa Romeo (I have).

7 comments:

Anne Whitehouse said...

With the beginning of my first novel, Fall Love, I was told I write like Stephen King. Same with my new novel in progress. the beginning of my second novel Rosalind's Ring yielded Oscar Wilde.
bizarre.

NJS said...

Apparently I write like J. K. Rowling. Or Stephen King.

LCS249 said...

I grabbed two different sections from novel in progress and with the first I was told "Raymond Chandler," and with the second I was told "Stephen King."

The novel is neither a hard-boiled detective story nor a horror tale. I'm guessing their data-base is limited...

Erika D. said...

Yes, the whole thing is a little questionable. But POPULAR!

Sharon K. Mayhew said...

Thanks for the links...I can't wait to check out I Write Like... It sounds like a fun site.

David Abrams said...

I fed the first 1,300 words of my novel (a dark comedy about the Iraq War!) into this analysis machine. Result: H.P. Lovecraft. I doubt Cthulhu ever toted an M-16.

Erika D. said...

David, you're the first one to report Lovecraft--who turned up when I fed in the first few paragraphs of my collection's opening story, too. I'm beginning to have many doubts about this instrument, but there's clearly a niche for someone who wants to build one that's more comprehensive and accurate.